Best Paris Luxury Rentals

Stay in the finest homes in Paris

Maybe the Europe’s most famous – and most beautiful – capital, Paris has been the epicentre of artists, writers, and travellers for hundreds of years, captivating their imagination and being the torch of illustration for the whole world. From its impressive wide avenues to its charming tiny squares, the city of lights is the perfect destination for luxury holidays.

Here is a selection of the most beautiful luxury apartments in the most exclusive locations that  will guarantee your perfect stay.

Paris IV-Le Marais

Le Marais is the closest you will get to the feel of medieval Paris and has more pre-revolutionary buildings and streets left intact than any other area in the city. A lively neighbourhood with lots of trendy bars, shops, and restaurants.

Marais Garden Residence

Le Marais luxury rental

This luxury vacation apartment offers peace and quiet and a contemporary feeling in a historic setting. Marais Garden is located in a 17th century monastery and was completely rebuilt using all original materials. Read more

Angevin Prestige Residence

Le Marais luxury rental

There is no place quite like this exquisite luxury apartment to make you feel the charm of Paris, as the beautiful city lies at your doorstep. Designed in 2014, this location combines modernity, charm and luxury. Read more

Paris VII-Saint Germain

The neighborhood is among the most prestigious in the capital. Stroll along the boulevard and you will be able to breathe a concentrate of culture and art, in the heart of the French historical institutions and luxury boutiques.

Saint-Thomas Residence

Luxury rental at Saint Germain

This prestigious luxury home is located in the heart of Paris’s high-end left bank (“Rive Gauche”), hidden behind a splendid façade of the renowned street Boulevard Saint Germain, which needs no further introduction. The perfect choice for a short or long term stay with family and friends. Read more

Eiffel Tower Apartment

Eiffel Tower luxury apartment for rent

Situated close to the Eiffel Tower, this spacious 2-bedroom and 2-bathroom apartment has been recently redecorated: typical Turkish carpets, white furniture, orange-brown bathroom tiles, a note of faded Kurd lemon yellow in the bedrooms. Read more

Paris V-Latin District

Intellectual life, stunning architecture and ongoing cheerfulness. With small streets and classical buildings, the Latin Quarter feels like a village. In the historical part, you will find the 800-year-old Sorbonne University (where Latin used to be the common tongue) and the famous Pantheon. Around rue Mouffetard is where the life is: crêperies, fine street food, student cafés, great shops and terraced brasseries!

Chocolate Factory Residence

latin Paris luxury rental

Original and secret, this is the sweetest residence you could find in Paris, we guarantee it. Its sweetness comes from its past uses, as the loft used to be a chocolate factory. Read more

Notre Dame Luxe Residence

Notre Dame Apartment

If you want to spend exceptional moments with your loved one or if you are searching for a cosy nest only for you, this 1-bedroom apartment is your perfect place. Beautifully decorated, this residence offers a romantic atmosphere, promising meaningful moments and deep relaxation. Read more

Paris VIII- Champs Élysées

The Champs Elysées district is undoubtedly Paris as you usually imagine it. Wide avenues, designed by Baron Haussmann, showcase all the opulence and luxury of the city.

Anjou Palace Residence

Opera Vendome luxury rental

Discover an easy, relaxed way of living at a two-level apartment in the famous boutique-lined Faubourg St.-Honoré district. This duplex achieves Haussmanian splendor without a hint of stuffiness—ideal for a multiple generations of a family traveling together in Paris. Read more

Triomphe Residence

Triomphe luxury apartment

This restful 1-bedroom / 1-bathroom condo is full of charm and mixes classical and modern features. Enjoy this living space which is made up of a comfortable and refined living room, a well-equipped American kitchen which gives onto an agreeable dining room. Read more

Paris XVIII-Montmartre

Sacre-Coeur Triplex luxe Residence

sACRE COEUR APARTMENT FOR RENT

This pretty triplex residence in Montmartre is situated right next to the Funicular. Designed in a modern style, you will feel all the comfort you need in an exceptional neighbourhood. Read more

Berthe II Residence

Montmartre home for vacation rent

This cosy and charming Parisian holiday rental is conveniently located in a recently renovated building, near the Sacré-Cœur, just a few minutes away from Pablo Picasso’s workshop, right in the Butte of Montmartre. Read more

Our experts handpick the best luxury rentals in Paris and provide you with a unique range of hotel services to ensure you the perfect vacation rental.

Best Paris travel apps

Top 6 Travel Apps for visiting Paris

Paris is a vibrant city, with each of its corners full of eateries, museums, routes, attractive places, and different historical spots, and it can be overwhelming for newcomers to organize their trips in Paris for the first time. Having this in mind, Europea Residences has listed for you our favourite Paris apps so that, wherever you are, you can explore the city at your fingertips.

1. Paris Metro

The subway is the preferred way to move from place to place for Parisians and tourists, the Paris Metro app is perfect to plan your journey as it provides you with all the information on schedules and stations. With this app, you will find it easy to move through the 303 stations and 16 lines spread across the city.

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Metro entrance in Paris

2. My Little Paris

If you’re after a more interested on Paris’s cultural events, try out this app. Every few days it updates you with the last cultural events, from a Swing concert in a park to cooking lessons in a houseboat. This is the perfect app to improvise plans during your stay.

3. Le Fooding

The guide of definitive French restaurant for Parisians. Using this app is as simple as introducing your taste preferences, then the app will suggest you the best eateries nearby. You will have all the Parisian cuisine available in the palm of your hand.

4. Heetch

This is the perfect app for the night owls; if you plan to go out and need a transport between 8 pm and 6 am, Heetch is the solution you are looking for. This French app works like Uber but only operating during the night, its main advantage is that a night fee won’t be charged.

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The best way to come back to your holiday apartment

5. The Louvre App

Visiting the Louvre is a must-do for every visitor in Paris. As its vast collection of art pieces from all époques and cultures can be just too much for some visitors, this app would be useful in this case. The Louvre App eases you with detailed information about different expositions, itineraries, schedules and interest points of the worldwide known museum.

6. Secrets de Paris

With this app you will have the hidden spots of Paris in the palm of your hand: the best rooftops, hidden passageways, streets, the most obscure monuments, and the newest and most innovative restaurants. Secrets de Paris allows you to explore the city like real Parisians do.

App for travelling in Paris
Discover Paris in a different way

Although technology is a useful tool for travelling nowadays, at Europea Residences, we believe that nothing can compare to real human care which makes your stay truly unforgettable, that’s why our private concierge is 24/7 available to assist you in any problems you have during your stay in the city of light.

 

 

About Montmartre… and wine

Do you know that it’s possible to sip on the fine wine made of grapes grown in a Parisian vineyard? Not many people are aware of this oddity despite that there are five vineyards in the French capital. If you’re going to be in Paris between October 11th and 15th, you may consider going to Montmartre to join in the celebration of its 84th wine festival. Here is some information about this unique event:

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One of Montmartre’s vineyards, which is called “Clos Montmartre”, has a very unusual history: Montmartre used to be a hill outside of Paris, and for many centuries it was partly covered with vineyards. Unfortunately, by the beginning of the 20th century, the vineyards were gone and had been replaced by houses and buildings. In 1933, the City of Paris decided to have some constructions built on the wasteland it owned at the corner of rue Saint-Vincent and rue des Saules. The plan was eventually abandoned due to the opposition of local residents. Instead, the association “Le Vieux Montmartre” was allowed to create a vineyard where the wasteland was. This was a true challenge as the land was facing the North and was unable to be exposed to enough sunshine, but somehow the vineyard survived and in 1934 the first “Fete des Vendanges” was organised there, and it has been celebrated every 2nd week of October ever since.

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This harvest festival is extremely famed and captivating. For a period of 5 days, Montmartre will be exceedingly flourishing owing to the concerts, special events, exhibitions, organised visits and even balls that are going to be held over there. One of the special events is “Parcours du Goût” which invites you to taste local food. Moreover, Portugal will be the honoured guest of this year and it will bring you specialties from 5 Portuguese regions. On Thursday, October 12th, you can immerse yourself in the traditional Portuguese singing (Fado concert) at the theatre “Les Trois Baudets”.  http://www.lestroisbaudets.com/spectacle/fetes-des-vendanges-lumieres-et-vins-du-portugal/

Traditionally, the “ban des vendanges” is supposed to be the opening of a grape harvest. In Montmartre, the grapes are harvested in September, but there is still a “Ban des Vendanges” during the festivities. It will take place on Saturday, Oct.14th at 10 am at the vineyard. Unfortunately, you can only participate if you are one of the lucky ones who got invited. Otherwise, you still can appreciate the incredibly colourful parade that follows the “Ban des Vendanges” which starts at Clos Montmartre at 11.45 am and finishes at Place Jules Joffrin at 1 pm. You’ll be able to see the members of the République de Montmartre with their long black capes, black hats, and red scarves. Among them are ministers, ambassadors, and of course the president. The “Petits Poulbots” is another local tradition, a drummer group made of young Montmartre inhabitants. The people wearing long capes and holding a banner are “Confréries”, associations of people who have a common interest. Usually, there are also Batucada groups (Brazilian drums) and Bagads (Celtic music) groups from Britanny. This year, Tuna, a group of Portuguese students who pay for their studies by playing music, will participate the event as well. Majorettes (some sort of cheerleaders) and many other surprises are waiting for you!

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As for the wine “Clos Montmartre”, let’s be honest, it used to be criticised as “not worth drinking”. Thanks to some enologists, the vineyard experienced positive evolution afterwards. Nowadays, this Parisian wine is said to be “decent”. Clos Montmartre is a small vineyard of less than 2000 square meters, and its usual production varies from 1000 to 2000 bottles a year. The Syndicat d’Initiative of Montmartre has them in the store all year round, and you can also buy one at 50 euros a bottle from their site: https://www.comitedesfetesdemontmartre.com/?p=21.

A bit too expensive for a “decent” wine? Well, it’s a good deed too, since the Syndicat d’Initiative allocates the money to their charitable projects…

Paris: The Best Ice Cream Parlours

With temperatures reaching 28°C this week in Paris, you must be rummaging the streets for a cool and sweet delight. Sweat no more! Make your ice cream break a truly special, truly Parisian event by visiting the best ice cream parlours this city has to offer.

The traditional one: Berthillon

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Berthillon is all about tradition, creation and … passion. Situated on the charming Ile Saint-Louis, Berthillon has been hailed the best ice-cream parlour in the world. Founded in 1954, the fabrication process remains unchanged, under the caring surveillance of the founder’s granddaughter. The artisanal ice creams are created on the shop’s first floor, and this institution remains the go-to place for a traditional ice cream. The flavours are also on the traditional side, and the best sellers remain vanilla, chocolate, cafe or salted caramel. Somewhat oddly, the shop is closed in August, but you will easily find places around that sell these ice creams during this month. Keep your eyes open!

Address (closed in August): 29-31 rue Saint-Louis en l’Ile, IVe.

The hip one: Une Glace À Paris

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Head to the charming neighbourhood of Le Marais to taste the creations of Olivier Ménard, who previously worked for Pierre Hermé and Harrods (London), and Emmanuel Ryon, who has been elected Meilleur Ouvrier de France as well as World Champion of Patisserie. At Une Glace À Paris, the pair offers twenty-four flavours of artisanal ice creams and sorbets « à la française », made in the shop’s basement. What makes this place special is the mix of different perfumes you can find in a single spoon. If you are an ice-cream fan, try their different flavours in a single scoop such as buckwheat-nougatine or smoked vanilla-baba au rhum. If you are more of a sorbet fan, you can safely go for their best seller: orange, carrot and ginger. The menu extends to other types of patisseries glacées. To share with your family and friends, I suggest their vacherin cake, re-imagined with mango for a modern, fresh twist.

Address: 15 rue Sainte-Croix-de-la-Bretonnerie, IVe.

The rock and roll one: Glaces Glazed

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This time, prepare to be surprised by the striking modernity and boldness of the ice-creams and sorbets you can find at Glaces Glazed. Every ice-cream title is associated with a film or song, and here are a few examples of what you might expect. The Black Sugar Sex Magic is a surprising sorbet of chocolate, wasabi and ginger. The Mojito de Tokyo has a wonderful cocktail of rum, mint and organic lemon in it. Pump up the Volume contains mango and Espelette spice. If you like ice-pops, they have a nice selection as well, including their own Smell Like Teen Spirit, which contains absinthe and apple liquor. This year, you can go even bolder and try their range of wild plant flavours ice-pops. Oh, and they’re really pretty too.

Address: 54 rue des Martyrs, IXe.

The one with a twist: À la Mère de Famille

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Now that we are on the subject of ice-pops, À la Mère de Famille has also decided to take the plunge this year and make their own version. The shop is already a Parisian institution for sweets and chocolates, and a must-go for those with a sweet tooth who want to taste French sucreries. They do not disappoint with their ice creams and pops! The twist to their ice-pops is the addition of their own fruit paste, cut in chunk within the juice ice-pop. Un délice! Their ice-cream selection will be a fierce rival in your decision process against the ice-pops, with comforting choices such as my all-time favourite: chocolate-caramel coated with dark chocolate with caramelized almonds.

Address: 35 rue du Faubourg Montmartre IXe. 

Bon appétit!

 

 

Summer In Paris: 4 Pop-Up Terraces In Beautiful Locations

Paris is one of the world’s most beautiful cities; I will be the first to admit it. But being French, we always have to complain about something: and during summer, the city can become somewhat insufferable. The capital is swarming with tourists, and with every degree (Celsius) over 30, the air gets stuffier and the Parisians grumpier. Thankfully, the city is ready this year and offers wonderful opportunities to deeply enjoy Paris in style, while taking a break in one of the following beautiful terraces.

L’été de Saint-Germain

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Nestled behind the famous Saint-Germain des Prés Abbey, L’Été de Saint-Germain is a perfect place to rest after a visit to the historical location. The bar is located in the Palais Abbatial, built in 1586 for the Cardinal de Bourbon. The terrace and its majestic trees offer a peaceful location to enjoy an afternoon tea or an evening cocktail. With concerts of a wide variety – ranging from French pop to rock and jazz –, this historical hangout will be filled with both locals and well-informed tourists for the whole summer.

Summer House at the Mona Bismarck American Center

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Head up the Seine from the Champs Élysées to reach the Mona Bismarck American Center. This cultural centre has everything planned for the season with its bustling summerhouse! Concerts and open-air cinema sessions will be hosted there (Singin’ in the Rain is on the calendar!), with delicious food offered by different guest chefs. If you want a calm evening, visit the summerhouse during the week when chill music with food and wine tasting are offered. The location itself is very unique – a 400 square metre beautiful terrace in the dreamy scenery of a 19th hotêl particulier, across the Seine from the Eiffel Tower. You can enjoy this terrace until 30th September.

Les Nocturnes du Café Renoir at the Musée Montmartre

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In the bustling quartier of Montmartre, a bucolic and peaceful café opens its doors to visitors everyday, and exceptionally this summer on Thursday nights. Situated inside the Musée Montmartre, discover the romantic scenery where the illustrious painter Renoir lived for a while. A much-needed secret haven to relax from Montmartre’s busy streets, the garden is best enjoyed with a cup of tea and a cake, or indeed on Thursday nights for the Nocturnes, where cocktails and wines are served under the stars.

Le Bar à Ciel Ouvert by Krug

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In terms of luxurious summer Parisian experiences, nothing can beat a glass of champagne with a spectacular view of the Eiffel Tower. This is what Le Bar à Ciel Ouvert by Krug offers until August 26th. The bar is the result of a collaboration between the Hotel Shangri-La and Krug, the world’s best-rated House of Champagne. The hotel itself was built in the 19th century, and is part of the Historical Monuments of Paris since 2009. One of the most beautiful rooms of the hotel has been remodelled for the occasion, and the magic happens on the terrace. Open from 6 pm to 11 pm, at Le Bar à Ciel Ouvert, you can enjoy the sun setting behind the Eiffel tower while tasting prestigious champagnes of the illustrious house.

La Coulée Verte: An Oasis In The Heart Of Paris

City life can be tiring, and a day might come when you’ll feel like taking a rest from Paris. Here’s a secret place you can go to enjoy the soothing powers of nature, all this without even leaving Paris. This place is nearly a secret because it was created fairly recently, in the 80’s and 90’s. To make it even more secret, the maps and signs you’ll see in Paris don’t all call it by it’s official name, which is La Coulée Verte Réné Dumont, but call it by the two names that were first used, Viaduc des Arts for a section and Promenade Plantée for another.

La Coulée Verte replaced the tracks of a railway line which ceased to be used in 1969. It is now a pleasant 4,7 kilometers long promenade (2,9 miles), where you feel very far away from Paris.

It is not at all a monotonous strip. As a matter of fact, it is made of very diverse sections:

The first one, also known as Viaduc des Arts starts close to the Opéra Bastille (situated close to our residences Bastille and Marjorelle), on rue de Lyon. In order to reach it, you’ll have to go up the stairs of what looks like a building with Viaduc des Arts written in large letters. And there it is, like a long, endless terrace, covered with numerous bushes and trees. You can observe people taking a stroll, jogging, or just relaxing on the many benches. Soon, you’ll reach basins surrounded by bushes and flowers. Ducks use them to take a wash, sparrows to take a drink. But above all, the  viaduct is an ideal observation point to study  the architecture of Parisian buildings. The path is elevated to the height of the third floor of the surrounding buildings and therefore you can easily see details of the elaborate roofs of the Haussmannien buildings, with their strange decorations, roof accesses and walkways for the chimney sweeps.

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La Coulée Verte (Credit: James Neidert)

Next, you’ll cross a park named Jardin de Reuilly-Paul-Pernin. It is an amazing collection of little gardens built around different themes. You might choose to go over it using a modern bridge that bounces a little. But should you choose to visit the parc, you must take a look at La Pétillante, which is a fountain where you can fill a recipient with Parisian water, either at room temperature, or cool or as fizzy water. This treat being free, many locals come to fill their bottles, as if were spring water.

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Jardin de Reuilly-Paul-Pernin (Credit: James Neidert)

Next, you’ll reach the section of Allée Vivaldi. It is at street level and has a more classical look, as it is a long park in the middle of a sreet. However, should you want to have a meal, Allée Vivaldi offers a fantastic choice of restaurants: Ristorante Bella Tavola, Jodhpur Palace, Le Village Corse, Les Jardins de Manchourie and Le Janissaire, the latter being specialized in Turkish gastronomy.

Now, you are ready for the last and most extravagant section, the part which was first baptized La Promenade Plantée. It is a paradise for nature lovers, with a large variety of plants, carefully arranged in an organized mess. Bikers and joggers haven’t been forgotten and the track is divided in two partitions, one side is paved, the other covered in compacted clay. Should you want to watch a game of boules (a very French specialty) you might catch a group of “boulistes” playing on the dedicated “terrain de boulistes”. Or you could try one of the exercise machines to work out, thus entertaining the groups of people relaxing on the nearby benches.

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La Promenade Plantée (Credit: James Neidert)

La coulée Verte ends with another park named Square Charles Péguy. Should you not feel like walking back to Bastille, the nearest metro station is Porte Dorée.

Whatever you do, don’t get locked in as La Coulée Verte is closed at night! Check the closure times indicated on the boards as they range from 5.45 p.m. in winter to 9.30 p.m. in summer.

Bonne promenade!

All photo credits to James Neidert.

Paris: Discover The French Impressionists

Interested in a stay in this cultural hotspot? Check out our latest apartments.

In the 1860s, when Impressionism first made its appearance on the Parisian art scene, Impressionist paintings were considered scandalous. The painters captured modernity by choosing subjects that represented modern life, and by using different painting styles from the ones traditionally taught in Parisian schools. Impressionists also symbolised a Bohemian life that many were opposed to. Let us take a little Parisian tour of the museums where you can admire Impressionist collections, and cafés where Impressionists used to « refaire le monde », in other words, think the world anew.

Many wonderful museums have extensive Impressionist collections in Paris, and I cannot imagine a visit to the city without going to at least one.

The Musée Marmottan Monet has 300 Impressionist and post-Impressionist paintings. Among them, Impression Soleil Levant, the piece that gave the movement its final name. Interesting fact: the term “Impressionists” was first used by art critics as an insult!

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Monet’s “Soleil Levant”

At the Musée d’Orsay, the whole 5th floor is dedicated to Impressionism, with paintings by Monet, Renoir, Sisley, Manet, and many others. Even though many museums place paintings by Manet in the same room as Impressionists, it is interesting to note that Manet refused to associate with these new painters, and refused to exhibit with them in their time. The Musée d’Orsay currently hosts a wonderful exhibition. You can visit Beyond the Stars, The Mystical Landscape from Monet to Kadinsky which will run until 25th June. Even if you are only visiting the regular collection, make sure to buy your tickets in advance as queues to the museum get extremely long.

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Eduard Manet’s “Le déjeuner sur l’herbe”

Across the Seine from the Musée d’Orsay, in the Jardin des Tuileries, is the Musée de l’Orangerie, where the impressive Nympheas, Monet’s masterpieces, are kept in two dedicated rooms. Sit in the centre and surround yourself in this river of colours, of greens and blues. I could stay there for hours! On the bottom floor, 144 Impressionist and post-Impressionist pieces are also waiting to be admired.

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Have a sit down and enjoy Nympheas by Monet

Cafés were an important social place for Impressionists. There, they painted their modern subjects, discussed techniques with other painters, and discussed art with other artists: writers, poets, musicians…  Unfortunately, time and the requirements of urbanism have transformed almost all the cafés, but I still like to walk through the streets often frequented by Monet, Baudelaire or Renoir.

At the Café Guerbois, Emile Zola was a regular, and Manet started coming in 1866, when his studio was at 34 boulevard des Batignolles. Today, a shoe shop at 9 Rue De Clichy has replaced it. It is a known fact that, in 1870, Manet slapped his friend and art critic Edmond Duranty in the Café Guerbois because of an article the latter had written. They had a duel, but thankfully no one got seriously injured, and the two eventually made up.

The Café de la Nouvelle-Athènes at the Place Pigalle was a meeting-place for artists like Manet and Degas around the end of the 1870s. It was destroyed in 2004.

Last but not least, the Brasserie des Martyrs. It is the only place that has not been destroyed, and is in fact still a place where art is discussed. It is now called the Divan du Monde (the world’s sofa) and is a cabaret-restaurant at 75 Rue des Martyrs and is just a short walk from our Sacré-Coeur Charme Residence.

Enjoy your time in Paris, the city that witnessed and contributed to the development of French Impressionism!

Paris: How To Spend A Day With Rodin

The year 2017 marks the centenary of the death of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. This is why you’ll hear a lot about him, should you visit France this year.

If you’re staying in our apartments in Paris, here’s a suggestion on how you could spend a day with Rodin and learn many things about this great artist.

A centenary exhibition has been organised at the Grand Palais (3 Avenue du Général Eisenhower) until July 31st. It is a huge success, and in order to avoid queuing up for hours, you can book your ticket here. It is also a good idea to choose an audio-guide. Since many people are expected to visit this excellent exhibition, I would recommend heading there in the morning. Besides learning more about Rodin and his art, you will find information on the history behind many of his works as well as his influence on other artists.

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Home of the exhibition: Paris’s stunning Grand Palais (credit: Getty Images)

You may have heard of the sculptress Camille Claudel. This amazing woman met Rodin in 1882. He was 42, she was 18. Together with other young female artists, she was practicing her art under the direction of sculptor Alfred Boucher. As Boucher was going to be in Rome for several months, he asked  Rodin to replace him. Soon, Rodin noticed how talented Camille was. In 1884, she started working for him. Eventually, the two artists became passionate lovers and rivals.

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Camille Claudel and a fellow sculptress in her studio

The exhibition will enable you to compare what Rodin and Camille Claudel made of the same model, an elderly lady. Rodin saw her as “Celle qui fût la belle Heaulmière”, named after a poem on lost youth and beauty. More originally, Camille Claudel created “Clotho”, a strange statue representing the youngest of the Three Fates in Greek mythology, who decide human destiny.

You will also be able to admire a mask of Camille Claudel, assembled with a reproduction of a hand of Pierre de Wissant. This mask highlights the simple beauty and frailty of Camille as a young woman.

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Same model: Celle qui fût la belle Heaulmière (Rodin) versus Clotho (Claudel)

To continue your day with Rodin, you could spend the afternoon at Musée Rodin (77 rue de Varenne). The museum is in a mansion known as Hôtel Biron, and surrounded by a large and pleasant garden, right in the middle of Paris.

You can enhance your visit of the museum and of the garden with an excellent audio-guide. It will give you additional information on Rodin’s masterpieces. One room of the museum is dedicated to Camille Claudel. There, the outstanding originality and talent of this artist is made obvious.

However, the end of Camille’s life was tragic. After years of passionate love, Rodin and Camille Claudel parted. Camille wanted Rodin to marry her, but he seemed unable to separate from Rose Beuret, a seamstress he had met during his youth. Rodin tried to help Camille and boost her career, but she grew suspicious of him. She would refer to him as “la fouine”, the snoop. Gradually, Camille became so isolated and hard to deal with that after her father’s death, her family decided to have her locked in a mental institution. She remained there until her death in 1943. During the 30 long years of her seclusion, her mother and her sister never visited her. Her brother, Paul Claudel, who had become a well-known writer, visited her on 13 occasions.

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Scenic grounds: the setting of Musée Rodin

By the time Camille was put in a mental institution, Rodin was an old man. Apart from sending her money, he was not able to give much support. Rodin had many mistresses and never parted from Rose Beuret. However, Camille Claudel had a special place in his heart. When he planned Musée Rodin, he included an exhibition space for Camille’s works. In so doing, Rodin made the link between his work and the work of his unfortunate love unforgettable.

Paris: The Must-See Ballets This Season

Paris is a city of many wonders and its inspiring artistic tradition is a big reason for its magic. A visit to Paris would not be complete without going to see a show at one of the wonderful stages the city has to offer, the most famed being that of the Palais Garnier, a majestic building and source of inspiration for The Phantom of the Opera. We are approaching the end of  ballet’s summer-spring season, but Opéra de Paris still has plenty of contemporary dance and classical ballets to suit your tastes:

À Bras-le-Corps – Dimitri Chamblas, Boris Charmatz

Palais Garnier, March 16 – May 2

Dimitri Chamblas and Boris Charmatz became friends during their studies at the Paris Opera Ballet School. They co-authored À Bras-le-Corps in 1993. Their work has been described as ground-breaking for French dance. With music by Niccolò Paganini, the ballet was first shown in a type of boxing-ring and is still performed by the two choreographers, who have let the ballet evolve with them.

Get tickets here.

Merce Cunningham / William Forsythe

Palais Garnier, April 14 – May 13

You will also have the chance to see a French take on the American style through three works: one choreographed by Merce Cunningham and two by William Forsythe, united as one representation lasting just under two hours. Merce Cunningham’s Walkaround Time (1968) is a modern ballet, set to David Behrman’s music. In Paris, the sets are inspired by the works of surrealist Marcel Duchamps. On his side, William Forsythe explores the limit of classical ballet with his two offerings created in the 1990s, while Trio contains Beethoven’s composition.

Get tickets here.

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Rehearsals for the varied performance (credit: Ann Ray / OnP)

Robbins / Balanchine/ Cherkaoui, Jalet

Palais Garnier, May 2 – May 27

These are three symphonic ballets set to the music of Maurice Ravel: inspired by  different music styles, namely valse, jazz and boléro. Le Boléro – the third ballet performed for this consecrated show, is considered one of his most famous works, which he composed on a recommendation from his friend Ida Rubinstein and then dedicated to her. An interesting fact about this piece is that Ravel was rather dissatisfied with the international success the ballet received and felt that the piece was « empty of music ».

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La Sylphide – Pierre Lacotte

Palais Garnier, June 1 – June 16

La Sylphide was created in 1832 by Filippo Taglioni at the Opéra de Paris, with music by Jean Scheitzhoeffer. Filippo Taglioni created this ballet especially for his daughter, Marie Taglioni, who danced in the first representation of it with what some say was the first tutu! He took into account his daughter’s peculiar body with her long legs and arms, large hands and ill-formed toes of the same length, allowing her exceptional balance on her tips. The ballet received immediate praise in 1832, but was forgotten by the end of the century. Pierre Lacotte revived La Sylphide for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1972, and it is this version you can attend in June.

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A previous representation of La Sylphide in Paris (credit: Ann Ray / OnP)

Drumming Live – Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s

Opéra Bastille, July 1 – July 15

Head to a representation of Drumming Live this season at the Opéra Bastille to see what is considered to be the Belgian choreograph Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s best work. This contemporary dance piece’s musical score was created by the minimalist New York composer Steve Reich. Performed several times since its creation in 1998, this original and quite abstract ballet follows particular music with 12 dancers bathed in a fluorescent orange light.

Get tickets here.

By the way, if you can’t get tickets for your preferred date, try La Bourse aux Billets for additional sales: http://boursechange.operadeparis.fr/.

Bon ballet!

 

Paris And Piaf: A Match Made In Heaven

Here’s a test: close your eyes and think of Paris. Now, what do you hear? Many will hear some kind of music, often involving an accordion. This is probably the result of watching numerous films where a scene set in Paris is heralded by some romantic music. Or maybe you’ll hear a powerful voice singing “La Vie en Rose” or “Non, rien de rien”? That is Edith Piaf, the wonderful Parisian. In this case, you must be a true fan.

Edith, whose real name was Édith Giovanna Gassion, had such an incredible life that one might think she is a fictional character. Born in Paris in December 1915, her mother was a café and street singer, her father a street acrobatic performer. Her mother left her with her maternal grandmother, who did not take proper care of her. Later, her father took Edith from that grandmother, and left her in Normandy, where his own mother ran a brothel. Edith was raised surrounded by prostitutes. Later, when she was nine, her father took her back to Paris, and she helped him collect money as he performed in the streets. One day, he asked her to sing to add to the show.

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Pensive Piaf (credit: Stafford Marilyn/SIPA)

At 15, she decided to leave her father. To survive, she took odd jobs and sang in the streets with a friend, until she was discovered in 1936 by a cabaret owner. He asked her to sing in his cabaret and that was the beginning of her career, which ended all too soon, in 1963. She died, exhausted by a life of tragedies and triumphs, abuse of alcohol and pain-killers for her polyarthritis – but happily married to her last love, Theo Sarapo, who was 20 years her junior.

Should you be an Edith Piaf fan, you could enhance your stay in Paris with a tour of some locations. Would you like to visit one of the apartments where Edith lived early in her career? One of her fans has transformed it into a small private museum dedicated to her, Le Musée Édith Piaf (5 rue Crespin-du-Gast). Here, you will be able to see one of the little black dresses she wore onstage and many objects that belonged to her. Remember to make an appointment by calling the number 01 43 55 52 72.

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An insight into Edith Piaf’s mind (credit: Getty Images)

After this, why not visit the places where she sang, that are still open to the public?

Bobino (14-20, rue de la Gaîté) hosts concerts, one-man shows and musicals. Piaf sang there in the late 1930s. It is also just a small walk away from our Tuilerie Parc residence.

Here’s an excellent reason for spending an evening at the Moulin Rouge (82 boulevard Clichy) and enjoying their slightly “risqué” shows: Edith Piaf sang there in the spring of 1944.

It is thanks to her that the music hall L’Olympia  (28 boulevard des Capucines) still exists. Bruno Coquatrix was its manager in the early 1960s. When he realised it was going bankrupt, he asked his friend Edith Piaf to help him out of his predicament. At the time, her health was in decline, but she could not resist the challenge. Besides, she wanted to introduce her new song “Non, rien de rien” to the public. As her first 30 performances were a triumph, she went on, despite her increasing frailty. At the end of Piaf’s 90 performancess, the financial situation of L’Olympia was no longer a problem. Nowadays, a wide variety of singers and groups perform at the venue. If you’re staying at our Michodière residence, it is worth the 10 minute walk.

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Crowds gather for Edith Piaf outside L’Olympia (credit: Getty Hulton Archive)

Have you ever visited Père Lachaise cemetery (16 rue du Repos)? It is an extraordinary, beautiful place, where many rich and famous Parisians are buried. Edith Piaf is one of them, and you could finish your pilgrimage with a walk through Père Lachaise to visit her tomb.

Edith Piaf loved Paris and sang various songs about the French capital. She hasn’t been forgotten by Parisians yet, and many can still sing a few of her songs.

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Edith Piaf continues to inspire art in Paris today (credit: francedailyphoto.com)